Showing posts with label Ming Dynasty. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ming Dynasty. Show all posts

Saturday, November 13, 2010

Ming Qu - re-live the Ming Dynasty


This city in central China is being rebuilt from scratch, a mammoth project on all levels.
All old buildings - mainly built during the Mao area are being razed to the ground, and replaced by new, modern buildings.
The city has embarked on a ten year campaign to complete modernization.


A historic place since thousands years, the city carries its heritage to a new modern futuristic design, where old and new is blended in harmony.


Here we see the replica of the Temple in Kaifeng being rebuilt, along with several other Ming style buildings. I watched carpenters trim and plane wood logs to join them in the traditional way.


No nail is found in ancient chinese buildings, and so it is kept till today. Planks, trusses are joined with wooden pegs into a harmonious design of pure wood art craftsmanship.


A scent of pine and fir can be found all over the new buildings. Apart from the fact that fir trees are used for construction, nothing but sheer beauty and architectural ancient chinese delights.


Will venture to another marvel to report here with more pictures soon.


from China


Heinz

Friday, November 12, 2010

World of Kublai Khan


Under the Mongol Yuan dynasty (1271–1368), China, for the first time in its long history, was subjugated by foreign conquerors, becoming part of the Mongol Empire. Yet during this century of occupation, Chinese culture not only survived but was renewed, and Yuan artists established new paradigms that had a profound influence on painting and calligraphy during the ensuing Ming dynasty (1368–1644).
The installation is organized chronologically into three sections. The first section, which focuses on the period from 1280 to 1350, illustrates the response of literati living in south China to Mongol occupation. Having withdrawn from government service out of loyalty to the fallen Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279) or having been prevented from serving due to the cessation of civil service examinations, these men often found sanctuary in the alternate bureaucracies of the Daoist or Buddhist religious establishments. Turning to art to express their emotions, they created escapist visions of unattainable paradises or wintry landscapes in which old trees became a metaphor for survival.

Mongols ruled China from 1271 - 1368