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The advantages of using Moringa in malnutrition prevention programs


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License







come to : Moringa Oleifera


By Lowell J. Fuglie



The many additional benefits of Moringa


1. Moringa’s leaves, flowers, bark, wood and roots are used worldwide for a large variety of medicinal purposes. But there are also many other uses for the tree. Among these:


2. Alley cropping : With their rapid growth, long taproot, few lateral roots, minimal shade and large production of high-protein biomass, Moringa trees are well-suited for use in alley cropping systems.

3. Bio gas : Moringa leaves provide an excellent material for production of biogas.

4. Dye : The wood yields a blue dye which was used in Jamaica and in Senegal.

5. Fencing : A common use of Moringa trees is as a living support for fencing around gardens and yards.

6. Foliar nutrient : Juice extracted from the leaves can be used to make a foliar nutrient capable of increasing crop yields by up to 30%.

7. Green Manure : Cultivated intensively and then ploughed back into the soil, Manure can act as a natural fertilizer for other crops.

8. Gum : The gum produced from a cut tree trunk has been used in calico printing, in making medicines and as a bland-tasting condiment.

9. Honey clarifier : Powdered seeds can be used to clarify honey without boiling. Seed powder can also be used to clarify sugar cane juice.

10. Honey producer : Flowers are a good source of nectar for honey-producing bees.

11. Livestock feed : The high bioavailability of Moringa leaves and stems make them an excellent feed for cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and rabbits.

12. Oil : The seed kernels contain about 40% edible oil, similar in quality to olive oil.

13. Ornamental : In many countries, Moringa trees are planted in gardens and along avenues as ornamental trees.

14. Plant disease prevention : Incorporating Moringa leaves into the soil before planting can prevent damping off disease (Pythium debaryanum) among seedlings.

15. Pulp : The soft, spongy wood makes poor firewood, but the wood pulp is highly suitable for making newsprint and writing paper.

16. Rope making : The bark of the tree can be beaten into a fiber for production of ropes or mats.

17. Tannin : The bark and gum can be used in tanning hides.

18. Water purification : Powdered seed kernels act as a natural flocculent, able to clarify even the most turbid water.


PUBLICATIONS


Fuglie, L., 1995. RĂ©pertoire des associations villageoises en Casamance. CWS/Dakar. 132p.

Fuglie, L., 1998. Producing food without pesticides. Local solutions to crop pest control in West Africa. CWS/Dakar and CTA/Wageningen. 158p.

Fuglie, L. 1999. The Miracle Tree. Moringa oleifera: natural nutrition for the tropics. CWS/Dakar. 68p.Fuglie, L., and M. Mane, 1999. L’arbre de la vie. Moringa oleifera: Traitement et prĂ©vention de la malnutrition. CWS/Dakar. 76p.Fuglie, L. (ed) et al, 2001. The Miracle Tree. The multiple attributes of Moringa. CWS/Dakar and CTA/Wageningen. 172p.Fuglie, L. (ed) et al, 2002. L’arbre de la vie. Les multiples usages de Moringa. CWS/Dakar and CTA/Wageningen. 177p.

WEBSITE REFERENCES


Lowell Fuglie and Moringa
: Establishment of new Moringa project in the North of Ghana

www.moringanews.org/documents/Leafproduction.doc
: “Intensive Moringa oleifera cultivation in the north of Senegal.”

www.moringatrees.org : Overview of CWS Moringa promotion project.


www.tropentag.de/2003/proceedings/node273.html
: Improving livestock nutrition with Moringa.

http://tinyurl.com/6uw32 : Traditional health alternatives: The Discovery Health Channel.


www.unesco.org/most/bpik10-2.htm : “Improving nutrition with Moringa “miracle” trees in Senegal.” Best Practices on Indigenous Knowledge : UNESCO/MOST.


























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